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Race Results Announced for the 12th annual Run for the River 5K/10K

July 28th, 2014 | Posted by Kate

Many thanks to the 516 runners and walkers who came out Saturday morning to support Save The River’s 12th annual Run for the River 5K/10K.  We saw record turnouts and the event was our biggest ever, raising several thousand dollars for our River protection programs.

Congratulations to our 5K Winner Duncan Stark with an amazing time of 16:49 and our Top 5K Female Susan Friedrich with an overall 10rd place finish and a 19:23 time. The first 10K overall winner was Lawrence Joseph Franks Jr. who timed in at 35:49 and our first 10k Top Female is Michelle Collie with a time of 35:49. Congrats to all runner and walkers on a spectacular race!

5K Results

Top Overall –Duncan Stark (16:49) 1st Place

Overall Female – Susan Friedrich (19:23) 10th place

Female 13 and Under – Emily Blight (23:39)

Male 13 and Under - Joshua Rainbolt (23:05)

Female 14-19 –Lynde Wrangler (21:19)

Male 14-19 – Xufeng Pan (17:38)

Female 20-29 – Amanda Schleicher (23:38)

Male 20-29 – Jordan Goff (18:41)

Female 30-39 – Caryn Pamphier (20:36)

Male 30-39 – Scott Wilkes (18:17)

Female 40-49 – Susan Beiswenger (23:08)

Male 40-49 – Steven Doe (18:05)

Female 50-59 – Laurie Beth Matthew (22:13)

Male 50-59 - Mike Sayers (21:04)

Female 60-60 – Sylvia Hungerford (28:51)

Male 60-69 – Thomas Cain (25:27)

Female 70+ – Kathy O’Neill (48:29)

Male 70+ – Robert Hasseler (23:03)

10K Results

Overall Male –Lawrence Joseph Franks Jr. (35:49)

Overall Female – Michelle Collie (41:40)

Female 14-19 –Joanne Bechaz (52:28)

Male 14-19 – Kevin Moore (42:49)

Female 20-29 –Krista Clarke (50:54)

Male 20-29 – Nathanael Franks (41:39)

Female 30-39 –Julie Curtin (42:09)

Male 30-39 – Gradin Junn (38:25)

Female 40-49 – Judith Carbonell (47:04)

Male 40-49- Matthew Westerlund (40:00)

Female 50-59- Karen Godshall (50:40)

Male 50-59- Gregory McLean (49:11)

Female 60- 69 – Nancy Werthmuller (49:11)

Male 60-69 –  Dave Kortz (50:40)

5K Results sorted by Age Group

5K Overall Results

10K Results Sorted by Age Group

10K Overall Results

Many thanks to our Generous Event Sponsors and Supporters! All proceeds from the event support our River protection and education programs!

American Legion Colon-Couch Post 821, Clayton

Against the Grain Gourmet

Caskinette’s Lofink Ford Mercury

Camelbak

Cheney Tire

Community Bank

Howard Orthotics & Prosthetics

Innovative Physical Therapy Solutions

The Phinney Charitable Foundation, Inc.

Reinman’s Department Store

Clayton Shur Fine

Clayton Chiropractic

Road ID

Frontenac Crystal Spring

And, many thanks to the many volunteers who help make the run possible along with organizations including Clayton Fire Police, Clayton Police Department, Thousand Island Emergency Rescue Service (TIERS), Thousand Islands Young Leaders Organization (TIYLO) and the Village and Town of Clayton.

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Critical Piece of Equipment Lost – Replacement Essential to Effort to Ban Microplastics

July 28th, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey

Microplastics researcher Dr. Sherri Mason, a speaker at Save The River’s Winter Environmental Conference earlier this year, has had an equipment loss that cripples her ability to conduct much needed research on microplastics in the Great Lake and the St. Lawrence River. Her research into this emerging threat has proven pivotal in the basin-wide effort to ban these tiny, toxin accumulating ingredients used in many personal care products.

Dr. Mason and Save The River need your assistance to keep the effort to understand and eliminate the threat of microplastics afloat.

Manta Trawl

Dr. Mason’s microplastic samples are taken using a net called a Manta Trawl. These nets are specially designed to float on the surface of the water, where the majority of the plastics accumulate. Unfortunately, as part of a recent shipboard science expedition, her manta trawl met with an untimely demise. It was sucked under the ship where it became tangled in the motor wheel and sank to the bottom of the Lake Erie.

Dr. Mason and her team cannot continue their ground-breaking work without a manta trawl. Save The River and many other organizations, including the New York State Attorney General, rely on her research in our efforts to ban microplastics.



Her first trawl was purchased in 2012 as part of the first-ever expedition for plastic pollution in the Great Lakes. Over the past three summers it has collected samples in all five of the Great Lakes, as well as the St. Lawrence River. These samples have shown that plastic pollution in Lakes Erie, Ontario and the St. Lawrence River have some of the highest counts of any place in the world sampled to-date – including the oceans.

Understanding the extent and impact of microplastic pollution and enacting effective bans requires scientific research, and diligent, focused advocacy based on that research.

Save The River is asking for your help to replace Dr. Mason’s Manta Trawl and to ban microplastics from our Lakes and River.

Please make a donation today so Dr. Mason can replace this critical piece of equipment. Each Trawl is made on demand at a cost of $3,500. That is our goal, with any additional money raised to be used in our efforts to secure a basin-wide ban of these harmful products.

Clich here to help buy Dr. Mason a new manta trawl.2014-07-22 Microbeads at Potters Beachsmall

More about Dr. Mason’s work:

Why Those Tiny Microbeads In Soap May Pose Problem For Great Lakes

More about our effort to ban microplastics:

ACTION NEEDED – Tell Your State Senator: Get Plastic Microbeads Out of Our Waters!

Save The River Calls for Ban on Microbeads

Push to Protect Waterways from Microplastics Continues


Thank you for your help in keeping this important research afloat and keeping the equally import effort to ban microplastics alive.

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Save The River Reports on Week 3 of Beach Watch Program

July 24th, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey

Clayton, NY (July 24, 2014) - Save The River’s Beach Watch Program is in the process of monitoring popular summer swimming locations on the River from July 7th through August 25th Save The River reports all samples passed in Week 3.

For the 2014 sampling season Save The River volunteers are collecting water quality samples at six swimming areas along the River: Wilson Beach in Cape Vincent, Potter’s Beach on Grindstone Island, Frink Dock in Clayton, Round Island in Clayton, Lake of the Isles on Wellesley Island, and Scenic View Park in Alexandria Bay. Save The River’s unique program provides a glimpse of the water quality at popular swimming areas during the peak recreational swimming season. Sampling dates for this year are July 7, July 14, July 21, July 28, August 4, August 11, August 18, and August 25.

As in previous years, Save The River will be testing for e. coli bacteria in all of our swimming locations and will compare water quality results with state and federal regulations. Save The River The results will be made available to the public each week with a pass/ fail system that is available at the Save the River offices, website and by following Save The River on Facebook and Twitter. Results will also be posted on www.swimguide.org and in the T.I. Sun.

Additionally, Save The River is currently looking for volunteers to help with the Beach Watch Program at Wilson Beach in Cape Vincent, NY. Water samples would need to be taken Monday morning and brought to the Save The River office in Clayton by 9:30am. If you are interested in volunteering please contact Save The River.

For more information please contact the Save The River office at (315)-686-2010 or visit www.savetheriver.org.

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Push to Protect Waterways from Microplastics Continues

July 23rd, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey
Push to Protect Waterways from Microplastics Continues
See more at: http://ow.ly/zviWo.

JEFFERSON COUNTY, N.Y. — Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is calling for the Environmental Protection Agency to add microbeads to their list of Great Lakes contaminants. If added, the EPA would likely address the problem in their upcoming action plan. A move that Save The River is thankful for.

“She has been very good on all issues related to water quality in the Great Lakes and her support shows that there’s a broader interest on the federal level,” said Save The River Executive Director Lee Willbanks.

But the non-profit said that getting the contaminant added to the list is just the first step. They want the state to ban microbeads and microplastics from products. They can be found in everything from face cream, to shampoos, and even on the tips of brushes.

“Because we believe that a bill, in the long run, will be more important,” said Willbanks. “But, both go hand in hand.”

Although the ban was presented to state lawmakers this year, it wasn’t passed before the end of session. Proponents of the bill are hoping it’ll become law when they return. They said the ban is desperately needed because the material is damaging the food chain.

“They accumulate the chemicals that are in the water and then they’re eaten by the fish because they look like small food particles,” said Willbanks.

Those fish are then eaten be larger fish, moving the toxic material upward. Supporters said it’s the reason why they won’t give up their fight.

Published on July 22nd, 2014 by Time Warner Cable News

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Plan 2014 must be enacted

July 22nd, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey

Our communities, economy and the environment experienced a significant win last month.

After five hard-fought years and a $20 million study that engaged nearly 200 stakeholder representatives and thousands of citizens, the International Joint Commission took unanimous, historic action to protect the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario and the North Country. It sent a new water regulation plan, now called Plan 2014, to the U.S. and Canadian federal governments for approval.

This action stands as one of the singular most important policy decisions of our lifetime. It is the direct result of efforts by north country citizens to bolster our environment and our recreation-based economy. Our leaders and neighbors should be proud of the role they have played in this historic step.

The benefits of Plan 2014 are well researched and well documented.

This new plan will restore wetlands, beaches and other coastal habitats that have been degraded by current regulation. To name a few of the ecological benefits: Wet meadows will increase by 40 percent; northern pike populations will increase by 39 percent; and marsh-nesting birds will make a comeback.

These environmental benefits lead to direct economic advances that benefit our region’s recreation-based economy and quality of life. Healthier lake and river wetlands will support stronger populations of native fish and wildlife, improving the area’s hunting, angling and wildlife-viewing opportunities.

The Nature Conservancy estimates economic benefits, just from improved wildlife recreation, of $4 million to $9.1 million per year, every year.

The battle is not over.

Opponents to the plan remain vocal, repeating mischaracterizations about the process and the plan without offering solutions. New York state has yet to publicly support the plan and may not due to election year politics.

And the parent agency of the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. has openly opposed the plan, stating the environment “cannot be accommodated” if doing so is detrimental to commercial shipping.

These factors cast shadows and doubts upon what should be a straightforward task: approval of the plan by the U.S. and Canadian federal governments without delay.

There is hope.

The opponents may be vocal, but their dissent is not widespread. While the opposition is largely located along the south shore of Lake Ontario, so are thousands of supporters of the plan.

For example, the IJC has received 1,000 letters and more than 3,000 petition signatures in favor of Plan 2014 (then called Bv7) from the south shore’s Monroe County.

New York under previous governors has endorsed a modern plan, and we are hopeful it will again under Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Environmental Protection Agency have expressed support for Plan 2014 as a balanced solution.

Alone among federal agencies is the Seaway, whose opposition is particularly confounding given the IJC’s conclusion that commercial navigation will not be harmed by Plan 2014. We do hold out hope as the Seaway’s new administrator, Betty Sutton, has repeatedly stated she puts a high value on the environment.

In an interview with the North Country Public Radio last August, she stated: “I am a person who rejects the kind of thinking that we sometimes hear — that it’s either the environment or jobs, jobs or the environment. I’m a person who believes it’s really important that we protect the great assets that we have. … I reject, ‘You’re either for the commercial aspects of the Seaway or you’re for the environment.’”

Administrator Sutton and the Seaway should seize this historic opportunity and accept the science that shows that the current plan is harming the environment and in turn our region’s economy, and that Plan 2014 is necessary to reverse that harm. We will welcome the Seaway’s support for a balanced approach to water levels management.

In the forefront of everyone’s mind who cares about the health of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River and the economies that depend on them should be this sobering statement from the IJC’s report: “If such an opportunity is lost due to delayed implementation of Plan 2014, then the next opportunity may not arise for decades.”

Our communities need this. In the river region, our economy is directly tied to our environment.

Plan 2014 will improve both. We can no longer claim that we don’t understand the effects of our outdated water levels plan — we have the data and knowledge we need to restore the lake and river.

Now we just need the wisdom and will to leave a healthy, vital and thriving river to the generations that follow.

The IJC has done its part; now our federal officials must do theirs and implement Plan 2014 immediately.

North Country Perspective by Lee Willbanks, Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper and Save The River Executive Director

Published by the Watertown Daily Times on July 22, 2014

Restoring the Common Tern in the Islands

July 18th, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey
Meet our newest Riverkeeper volunteers, Patti, Jennifer, and Nathan, they are dressed and ready for the part.
Don’t miss out on your chance to attend a Riverkeeper Volunteer Training. We still have openings in our next training on Wednesday, July 30th from 6-7pm at the Save The River office in Clayton. To register call 315-686-2010. See you there!

Tern1Once a very plentiful part of our waterbird population in the St Lawrence River Valley, the Common Tern has dropped to significantly low levels, due to a loss of nesting habitat and the expansion of Ring-billed Gulls. As a result of this dramatic decline in numbers, the Common Tern was listed as a threatened species in New York State. Save The River (STR) and the Thousand Islands Land Trust (TILT) have formed a cooperative effort, in conjunction with Dr. Lee Harper, of Riveredge Associates, to monitor Common Tern nesting areas on the River. Residents from the Chippewa Bay area have also been very involved in helping to monitor and restore Tern habitat.

STR first became involved in 1997, with TILT volunteering the use of their Eagle Wing Shoals and Tidd Island soon thereafter. TILT maintains some of the last natural nesting shoals, still utilized by Common Terns, on the Upper St. Lawrence River.

Tern 2

All of the date collected by STR and TILT’s volunteers is gathered on standardized reporting format and reported the o the season to Dr. Harper. This critically important information helps Dr. Harper plan for habitat restoration efforts. Most of the navcells have now been encircled by plastic netting, which helps to keep young chicks from jumping off the high cells into the River before they can fly. A necessary tool at chick banding time is a small fish net to retrieve “jumpers” who jump into the water. The Eagle Wings shoals located just off Clayton, has been covered with a polypropylene line grid, installed each spring and broken down late summer by TILT and STR volunteers. Holes are drilled into the granite and steel bars are stuck into the holes to anchor the grid. It is an intense fun day long effort. TILT transports the crew out to the islands in their fantastic work boat, lunch is provided for all volunteers. And more volunteers are always welcome!

To read the entire article visit thousandislandslife.com.

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Save The River Reports on Week 2 of Beach Watch Program

July 17th, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey

Clayton, NY (July 17, 2014) - Save The River’s Beach Watch Program is in the process of monitoring popular summer swimming locations on the River from July 7th through August 25th. Save The River reports all samples passed in Week 2.

For the 2014 sampling season Save The River volunteers are collecting water quality samples at six swimming areas along the River: Wilson Beach in Cape Vincent, Potter’s Beach on Grindstone Island, Frink Dock in Clayton, Round Island in Clayton, Lake of the Isles on Wellesley Island, and Scenic View Park in Alexandria Bay. Save The River’s unique program provides a glimpse of the water quality at popular swimming areas during the peak recreational swimming season. Sampling dates for this year are July 7, July 14, July 21, July 28, August 4, August 11, August 18, and August 25.

As in previous years, Save The River will be testing for e. coli bacteria in all of our swimming locations and will compare water quality results with state and federal regulations. Save The River The results will be made available to the public each week with a pass/ fail system that is available at the Save the River offices, website and by following Save The River on Facebook and Twitter. Results will also be posted on www.swimguide.org and in the T.I. Sun.

Additionally, Save The River is currently looking for volunteers to help with the Beach Watch Program at Wilson Beach in Cape Vincent, NY. Water samples would need to be taken Monday morning and brought to the Save The River office in Clayton by 9:30am. If you are interested in volunteering please contact Save The River.

For more information please contact the Save The River office at (315)-686-2010 or visit www.savetheriver.org.

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Information about blue-green algae available

July 11th, 2014 | Posted by Lee

Concerned about the possibility of blue-green algae in your favorite waterhole? Suspect a blue-green algae bloom? Want to receive weekly updates? Want to know what you should do if there is a bloom?

No blue-green algae blooms have been reported on the St. Lawrence River this summer. But conditions can change and it is wise to pay attention. The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation has an extensive website with updates on blue-green algae.safe_image

“Blue-green algae, technically known as cyanobacteria, are naturally present in lakes and streams in low numbers. Blue-green algae can form harmful algae blooms that discolor the water or produce floating rafts or scums on the surface of the water. These can cause health risks to people and animals when they are exposed to them.”

For more information about blue-green algae visit NYS DEC’s blue-green algae website. Of course, Save The River will post information on algae blooms on the River should they occur. And check out our weekly BeachWatch posts and the SwimGuide.

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Save The River Reports on Week 1 of Beach Watch Program

July 10th, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey

Clayton, NY (July 7, 2014) - Save The River’s Beach Watch Program is in the process of monitoring popular summer swimming locations on the River from July 7th through August 25th Save The River reports all samples passed in Week 1.

For the 2014 sampling season Save The River volunteers are collecting water quality samples at six swimming areas along the River: Wilson Beach in Cape Vincent, Potter’s Beach on Grindstone Island, Frink Dock in Clayton, Round Island in Clayton, Lake of the Isles on Wellesley Island, and Scenic View Park in Alexandria Bay. Save The River’s unique program provides a glimpse of the water quality at popular swimming areas during the peak recreational swimming season. Sampling dates for this year are July 7, July 14, July 21, July 28, August 4, August 11, August 18, and August 25.

As in previous years, Save The River will be testing for e. coli bacteria in all of our swimming locations and will compare water quality results with state and federal regulations. Save The River The results will be made available to the public each week with a pass/ fail system that is available at the Save the River offices, website and by following Save The River on Facebook and Twitter. Results will also be posted on www.swimguide.org and in the T.I. Sun.

Additionally, Save The River is currently looking for volunteers to help with the Beach Watch Program at Wilson Beach in Cape Vincent, NY. Water samples would need to be taken Monday morning and brought to the Save The River office in Clayton by 9:30am. If you are interested in volunteering please contact Save The River.

For more information please contact the Save The River office at (315)-686-2010 or visit www.savetheriver.org.

The Buffalo News Endorses Plan 2014

July 7th, 2014 | Posted by Lindsey

If there is one thing that the residents and business owners of Western New York should agree on, it is that they have a compelling interest in the health of the Great Lakes. In particular, Lakes Erie and Ontario are engines benefiting the economy, recreation and overall quality of life in this area while also providing a reliable source of water.

That’s why the work of the International Joint Commission is so important and why the agency wants to allow the level of Lake Ontario to fluctuate more than it does now, rising a few inches higher in spring and fall.

The plan deserves broad support – as do some worried residents of Niagara and Orleans counties. Those shoreline property owners are almost alone in opposing this plan, and while their concerns are legitimate and deserve attention, they also shouldn’t be allowed to block a well-considered plan that appears to do a good job of balancing a variety of important interests.

For 13 years, the commission – composed of American and Canadian members – has studied the environmental issues that artificial water levels have created on Lake Ontario since the construction of Moses-Saunders Power Dam on the St. Lawrence River in the 1950s. That project created an inexpensive supply of power and helped make the St. Lawrence Seaway navigable.

But the dam also allowed engineers to control the water level of Lake Ontario, and when those levels were agreed upon, no consideration was given to the effects on the environment, whose influences were poorly, if at all, understood.

But there has been a price. Lower lake levels have harmed wetlands along the shore, for example. Wetlands are natural pollution filters and they also provide habitat to amphibians, birds, mammals and fish. The degrading of those wetlands has damaged the health of the lake and of the creatures that make their homes there.

A better balance is necessary. The environment deserves a place at the table when considering the manipulation of lake levels, as do boating, fishing, shipping, power generation, recreation and, yes, the interests of homeowners along the lake shore.

In fact, according to members of the IJC, of all those interested parties, only homeowners along the southwestern shore of the lake are vocally opposed to what is known as Plan 2014.

Their concern is about the potential for flooding and property erosion, both of which can already occur as lake levels are managed today.

The criticism has been fierce. One group, the Niagara-Orleans Regional Alliance, went so far as to call the IJC’s work “government at its worst.” On its face, that’s not the case, given the amount of time the IJC has spent on this issue, including many public hearings. The fact is that homeowners on this part of the lake, virtually alone among those interested in this issue, believe they are better off with the status quo than with the proposed change that factors in environmental needs.

And, frankly, who can blame them? Their properties were purchased, improved and maintained based on a set of facts that may now be changing. This is a federal issue, ultimately to be agreed upon or rejected by the national governments of the United States and Canada. Those governments – mainly Washington – need to offer some level of protection to those property owners to help them prepare for and cope with the changes envisioned in Plan 2014.

These changes are worth making, to protect the lake that helps to define and improve life in this area. The benefits are such that the plan should be adopted, providing assistance to property owners along the southwestern shoreline and, if necessary, over their objections.

Published by Buffalo News on July 6th on buffalonews.com

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