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Now Accepting Applications for 2019 Seasonal Interns

February 11th, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

Save The River is now accepting applications for two seasonal (mid-May through Labor Day) paid internship positions. Save The River interns have the opportunity to work closely with staff and volunteers while gaining invaluable experience at the region’s leading environmental advocacy nonprofit organization. Click here to read the complete position description.

The deadline to apply is Friday, March 15, 2019. 

Save The River interns manage a diverse workload with primary responsibilities that include working in the storefront managing merchandise sales and encouraging visitors to become members, promoting public education, representing Save The River at community events including bass fishing tournaments, and implementing fieldwork projects including Beach Watch, Common Tern Monitoring, Shoreline Cleanups, and Catch and Release programs.

Ideal candidates will be enrolled in a graduate or undergraduate environmental or related program, have familiarity with the St. Lawrence River and community, and flexibility to work weekends and some nights.

To apply: send resume, cover letter, and contact information for at least one professional and one personal reference to Save The River, 409 Riverside Drive, Clayton, New York 13624, or email full application package to info@savetheriver.orgIn order to expedite the internal sorting and reviewing process, please write your name (Last, First) and Summer Internship as the subject line of your email.

 

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Calling All Photographers!

February 4th, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

We are now accepting submissions of St. Lawrence River photos for our annual calendar photo contest. All photos will be considered, including film prints and digital images, and pictures from all seasons on the River are encouraged. Over 90 images will be included in the calendar.

Photographers whose submissions are chosen as one of the 14 featured images (cover and 13 months) will receive a complimentary 2019-2020 calendar. Calendars will be available for sale in May 2019 with all proceeds directly supporting Save The River’s river protection programs.

The deadline for submission is March 4, 2019.

Information on submitting photos:

  • Submissions should include contact information including first and last name, mailing address, and email address.
  • Digital images must be high resolution and greater than 300 dpi. (Hint: The file size will be approximately 3 MB or larger).
  • Photographers submitting photos grant Save The River a non-exclusive right to use the image(s) for any purpose in perpetuity. Ownership of the image will remain the property of the photographer.
  • Photos can be submitted to Save The River via email to margaret@savetheriver.org with ‘Calendar Photo Contest’ in the subject or via postal mail to Save The River, Attention Calendar Photo Contest, 409 Riverside Drive, Clayton, NY, 13624.

Caption: The cover image of the 2018-2019 Save The River calendar was a unique submerged shot of the River bottom, taken by Anthony Ingerson. 

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Stopping Asian Carp: Past, Present, and Future

February 1st, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

Asian carp are one of the biggest threats facing the Great Lakes today. The damage caused by this invasive fish could devastate the world’s largest surface freshwater resource. At tomorrow’s 30th Annual Winter Environmental Conference Chad Lord will look at this threat, examine what has already been done to keep these fish out and provide insights into where the region can go to keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes.

Chad Lord serves as the Policy Director for the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition, where he develops and guides the implementation of the Coalition’s legislative and policy agenda in Washington, D.C. Before joining the HOW Coalition, Chad served for five years as senior legislative assistant for U.S. Representative Betty McCollum (D-MN). Chad’s portfolio included energy, environment, transportation, international trade and budget and appropriations. Chad lives with his husband and 5-year old daughter in Washington, D.C. Chad was raised in southwest Minnesota and lived in there before moving to the District of Columbia. He attended St. Olaf College where he majored in political science and received his Bachelor of Arts in 1995.

Other speakers at the Conference will include:

  • Peter Annin will analyze the future of Great Lakes water diversion management.
  • Dr. Sherri “Sam” Mason will discuss the realities of plastic pollution right here, right now in the Great Lakes region.
  • Evie Brahmstedt will describe her ongoing research about mercury in St. Lawrence wetlands.
  • Elaine Tack will present It’s Hard to be a Tern, her short film exploring Save The River’s common tern restoration program.
  • Dr. John Casselman will discuss the catastrophic decline of the American eel in the St. Lawrence River system.

Hear Chad speak tomorrow, February 2 at the WEC, hosted at Clayton’s 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel. Call (315) 686-2010 to register; $50 conference fee includes morning coffee and pastries, lunch, afternoon snack, and light appetizers during cocktail hour (cash bar).

 New this year: for those unable to make the trip to Clayton, we will be hosting a professional live stream of the WEC. In order to support this exciting new offering, there is a suggested donation of $25. The hyperlink for the live stream will be shared later today.

 

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Will Plan 2014 Create a Risk for Mercury Contamination?

January 30th, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

St. Lawrence River wetlands contain a legacy of mercury content from past and present atmospheric deposition. Wetlands are considered areas of active mercury transformation and cycling, particularly those experiencing water level fluctuations. At this Saturday’s Winter Environmental Conference, Evie Brahmstedt will describe her current research of mercury in St. Lawrence River wetlands examining how much mercury is present, where it is going, in what form, and how quickly.

Brahmstedt is an Environmental and Engineering Ph.D. student at Clarkson University’s Institute for a Sustainable Environment. Working in Dr. Michael Twiss’ Limnology lab, she is studying mercury cycling in freshwater riparian wetlands with a focus on the St. Lawrence River. Upon earning her Ph.D., Brahmstedt hopes to become a professor at an institution where she can further her research of freshwater wetland systems, teach and inspire future scientists, and be involved with environmental management through organizations that function at the interface of science and policy. In her spare time, Brahmstedt enjoys running marathon races.

Other speakers at the Conference will include:

  • Peter Annin will analyze the future of Great Lakes water diversion management.
  • Dr. Sherri “Sam” Mason will discuss the realities of plastic pollution right here, right now in the Great Lakes region.
  • Dr. John Casselman will explore the American eel, an elusive and highly migratory species whose population has faced a catastrophic decline in recent years.
  • Elaine Tack will present It’s Hard to be a Tern, her short film exploring Save The River’s common tern restoration program.
  • Chad Lord will explore the threat of Asian carp and what can be done to keep these invasive fish out of the Great Lakes.

Hear Evie Brahmstedt speak Saturday, February 2 at the WEC, hosted at Clayton’s 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel. Call (315) 686-2010 to register; $50 conference fee includes morning coffee and pastries, lunch, afternoon snack, and light appetizers during cocktail hour (cash bar). Click here for the registration form.  

New this year: for those unable to make the trip to Clayton, we will be hosting a professional live stream of the WEC. In order to support this exciting new offering, there is a suggested donation of $25. The hyperlink for the live stream will be emailed the week of the conference.

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American Eels in the St. Lawrence River System – Going, Going, Gone?

January 29th, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

At this Saturday’s 30th Annual Winter Environmental Conference, Dr. John Casselman will speak about the American eel, a species that was once very abundant in the St. Lawrence River system, making up half of the inshore fish biomass and was of great importance to First Nations communities. Learn about the American eel, an elusive and highly migratory species that spawns in the Sargasso Sea and matures in the continental waters of North America but whose population has catastrophically declined in recent years. What is unique about this important indicator species and are they going, going, gone?

Dr. John Casselman is an adjunct professor in the Biology Department at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Casselman is a fisheries ecologist and environmental physiologist who has numerous publications in the primary literature, reports, and book chapters on numerous aspects of fisheries science. He has published and presented widely on eels, climate change, fish and fisheries and has received numerous awards, including, in 2008, the American Fisheries Society prestigious Award of Excellence.

Other speakers at the Conference will include:

  • Peter Annin will analyze the future of Great Lakes water diversion management.
  • Dr. Sherri “Sam” Mason will discuss the realities of plastic pollution right here, right now in the Great Lakes region.
  • Evie Brahmstedt will describe her ongoing research about mercury in St. Lawrence wetlands.
  • Elaine Tack will present It’s Hard to be a Tern, her short film exploring Save The River’s common tern restoration program.
  • Chad Lord will explore the threat of Asian carp and what can be done to keep these invasive fish out of the Great Lakes.

Hear Dr. Casselman speak Saturday, February 2 at the WEC, hosted at Clayton’s 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel. Call (315) 686-2010 to register; $50 conference fee includes morning coffee and pastries, lunch, afternoon snack, and light appetizers during cocktail hour (cash bar). Click here for the registration form. 

New this year: for those unable to make the trip to Clayton, we will be hosting a professional live stream of the WEC. In order to support this exciting new offering, there is a suggested donation of $25. The hyperlink for the live stream will be emailed the week of the conference.

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Dr. Sherri Mason, Groundbreaking Researcher in Plastics Pollution, to Speak at Winter Environmental Conference

January 28th, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

‘Single-Use’ plastic was named the word of the year by Collins Dictionary highlighting the wave of news stories, social media hits, and policies that have become increasingly common over the last few years. Why? What is the problem with plastic?

At this year’s Winter Environmental Conference, Dr. Sherri “Sam” Mason will present a basic primer on what plastic is and the realities of plastic pollution right here, right now in the Great Lakes region.

Dr. Mason earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin and completed her doctorate in Chemistry at the University of Montana as a NASA Earth System Science scholar. While a Professor of Chemistry at SUNY Fredonia, her research group was among the first to study the prevalence and impact of plastic pollution within freshwater ecosystems. Among her accolades Dr. Mason was named an EPA Environmental Champion in 2016, was awarded for her Excellence in Environmental Research by the Earth Month Network in 2017 and was selected to receive a Heinz Award in Public Policy in 2018. She has recently moved into a new role as Sustainability Coordinator at Penn State Behrend.

Watch Dr. Mason’s Tedx Talk Beads of Destruction.

Other speakers at the Conference will include:

  • Peter Annin will analyze the future of Great Lakes water diversion management.
  • Evie Brahmstedt will describe her ongoing research about mercury in St. Lawrence wetlands.
  • Elaine Tack will present It’s Hard to be a Tern, her short film exploring Save The River’s common tern restoration program.
  • John Casselman will discuss the catastrophic decline of the American eel in the St. Lawrence River system.
  • Chad Lord will explore the threat of Asian carp and what can be done to keep these invasive fish out of the Great Lakes.

Hear Dr. Mason speak Saturday, February 2 at the WEC, hosted at Clayton’s 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel. Call (315) 686-2010 to register; $50 conference fee includes morning coffee and pastries, lunch, afternoon snack, and light appetizers during cocktail hour (cash bar). Click here for the registration form. 

New this year: for those unable to make the trip to Clayton, we will be hosting a professional live stream of the WEC. In order to support this exciting new offering, there is a suggested donation of $25. The hyperlink for the live stream will be emailed the week of the conference.

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Peter Annin, Leading Expert on Water Diversions, to Speak at the Winter Environmental Conference

January 28th, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

Peter Annin, author of The Great Lakes Water Wars, will be our featured speaker at this year’s Winter Environmental Conference (WEC). Learn about the long history of political maneuvers and water diversion schemes that have proposed sending Great Lakes water everywhere from Akron to Arizona. Through the prism of the past, this talk analyzes the future of the Great Lakes water diversion management, currently controlled by the Great Lakes Compact, a legal document that went into effect in 2008. Learn about several noteworthy Great Lakes diversions that already exist, along with potential water diversions of the future, including the controversial Foxconn water diversion that has been proposed south of Milwaukee, WI.

Peter Annin is the director of the Mary Griggs Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation at Northland College in Ashland, WI. Before coming to Northland College in 2015, Peter served as a reporter at Newsweek, the associate director of the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources, and the managing director of the University of Notre Dame’s Environmental Change Initiative. He continues to report on the Great Lakes water diversion issue and published a second edition of The Great Lakes Water Wars in the fall of 2018.

In addition to hearing Peter speak at the WEC, you’ll be able to purchase a copy of his recently released, revised version of The Great Lakes Water Wars ($30) and have your copy signed during an author meet and greet (hosted during the 12 – 1 pm lunch hour of WEC).

Hear Peter speak Saturday, February 2 at the WEC, hosted at Clayton’s 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel. Call (315) 686-2010 to register; $50 conference fee includes morning coffee and pastries, lunch, afternoon snack, and light appetizers during cocktail hour (cash bar). Click here for the registration form. 

New this year: for those unable to make the trip to Clayton, we will be hosting a professional live stream of the WEC. In order to support this exciting new offering, there is a suggested donation of $25. The hyperlink for the live stream will be emailed the week of the conference.

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Register for the 30th Winter Environmental Conference

January 3rd, 2019 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

Click Here for the Winter Environmental Conference Registration Form

Send us your completed registration form either by postal mail (409 Riverside Drive, Clayton, NY, 13624) or by email (kendall@savetheriver.org); we can also process your registration over the phone, call us at (315) 686-2010. 

This year we celebrate the 30th year of this important annual event. Thirty years of gathering to hear from national and regional policymakers, scientists, opinion leaders, students, and teachers about the topics of critical importance to the health of the St. Lawrence River. At this year’s conference, you’ll learn about the diversion of Great Lakes freshwater, research on American eels, the threat of Asian carp, plastics in our water, and research of mercury cycling in St. Lawrence River wetlands. We will also be premiering our short film, It’s Hard to be a Tern. We hope that you will join us in Clayton on the first Saturday of February! Please register by Friday, January 25, 2019.

SPEAKERS

  • Peter Annin Author of The Great Lakes Water Wars, originally published in 2006, revised and updated edition published in 2018. Director of the Mary Griggs Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation at Northland College in Ashland, Wisconsin.
  • Dr. John Casselmann Adjunct professor of biology at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario whose research focuses on American eels, a species whose population declined so greatly in recent decades that they are classified as an endangered species in Ontario.
  • Chad Lord Policy director of Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition, a group of more than 150 environmental, conservation, and outdoor recreation organizations all working toward restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. Chad will discuss the threat of Asian carp and the current work being done to prevent their spread into the Lakes.
  • Dr. Sherri Mason Professor at SUNY Fredonia, pioneered the first-ever survey of plastics pollution in the Great Lakes. Her findings led to the federal ban on plastic microbeads in consumer products like toothpaste, face wash, and more.
  • Elaine Tack spent her 14-year broadcast journalism career reporting in Chicago, Cleveland, and Las Vegas. She is well-known in the 1000 Islands for her generosity in using her time and talent to create films for local organizations.
  • Evie Brahmstedt, Ph.D. Student at Clarkson University, will discuss her research in mercury cycling in wetlands, with a focus on the St. Lawrence River.

SCHEDULE

  • 9:30 am: Registration and morning coffee; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm: Presentations (break for lunch from 12:00 – 1:00 pm); 4:00 pm: Cocktail reception with cash bar. The final schedule with the order of speakers will be released in January.

OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS

  • Save The River has reserved a limited block of rooms at the 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel starting at $119 per night. Reservations can be made by calling the hotel directly at (315) 686-1100. This discount rate is guaranteed through January 9.

*NEW THIS YEAR – LIVE STREAM*

  • For those who are unable to make the trip to Clayton, we will be hosting a professional live stream of the conference. The hyperlink to the live stream will be shared the week of the conference. In order to support this exciting new offering, please consider making an additional contribution of $25.

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Save The River Appoints Executive Director

August 24th, 2018 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

Save The River announced today that John Peach has been appointed to serve as the executive director and Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper. Peach had been serving as the interim executive director since mid-June while a search committee received applications from potential candidates. Peach previously served on Save The River’s board of directors for nearly two decades.

“John was the obvious and overwhelming first choice as the new executive director. His years of experience in not-for-profits along with his love of our River made him an easy selection,” said Jeff Garnsey, president of Save The River’s board of directors. “John brings with him the energy to guide our organization as well as hands-on experience to make the tough decisions required by the position.”

“My passion is that Save The River remains strong in our work to protect the Upper St. Lawrence River through advocacy, education, and research,” said Peach. “Now that Plan 2014 has been approved and is in operation, it will allow Save The River to focus on key river issues such as plastics in the River and water column, the very real threat of aquatic invasive species including Asian Carp, pollution from river municipalities, residential sewages, and agriculture run-off, and the threat of diversion of our precious fresh water. Save The River’s In the Schools and On the Water programs placed 950 students and 37 educators out on the River this year for hands-on scientific education. Our Common Tern restoration program in conjunction with Thousand Islands Land Trust (TILT) saw a record-breaking number of Tern chicks banded. Our Beach Watch water quality analysis of six swimming sites is now its twentieth year, and our shoalmarkers continue to guide River boaters safely around many of the area’s most treacherous shoals.”

John joined Save The River’s board in 2000 and has served in several key roles including as president from 2004-2007, on the executive committee, and most recently as treasurer leading the finance committee. He is an active volunteer in Save The River’s Common Tern Monitoring program and shoal marking program and will continue his work in these programs while serving as executive director. Prior to his retirement several years ago, Peach worked as an international business consultant in fields including arts, oceanographic research, environmental, and pharmaceuticals. He and his wife Pat call Huckleberry Island near Ivy Lea home for a significant portion of the year; their children and grandchildren represent the fifth and sixth generations of family living in the Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River region.

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Save The River Remembers Ken Deedy

August 16th, 2018 | Posted by Margaret Hummel

Save The River remembers Ken Deedy, Board of Directors Emeriti

Ken Deedy served on the Board of Directors from the mid-80s to 90s, a pivotal time in Save The River’s history as the organization developed dynamic programs engaging River residents and established a stable financial foundation with a permanent home in Clayton. Ken was an earnest and enthusiastic member of Save The River, someone who saw the big picture and was full of ideas for synergistic collaboration.

“I was very fortunate to come to know Ken over the last twenty years. He was one of the most intense individuals I’ve ever met when speaking about protecting our beloved Thousand Islands. Always generous with his time and money, he was usually in the lead on any project that benefited The River,” said John Peach, Executive Director of Save The River. “So it was no surprise to us when we learned that one of Ken’s final acts of generosity was to create the ‘Kenneth Deedy Environmental Internship Fund’ to benefit the work of Save The River, Thousand Islands Land Trust, and Minna Anthony Common Nature Center and ensure that these organizations continue to work together for the common good of The River.”

The Board and staff of Save The River are humbled and inspired by the example set by Ken in his work to protect the St. Lawrence River.

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Clayton, NY 13624

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