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2016 Beach Watch: Week 7 Results

August 18th, 2016 | Posted by Kate

Save The River Reports on Week 7 of Beach Watch Program

Clayton, NY (August 18, 2016) – Save The River’s Beach Watch Program is in the process of monitoring popular summer swimming locations on the River from July 5th through August 29th on a weekly basis.  Save The River reports all samples collected on August 15, 2016 have passed.

For the 2016 sampling season Save The River volunteers are collecting water quality samples at six swimming areas along the River: Wilson’s Beach in Cape Vincent, Potter’s Beach on Grindstone Island, Frink Dock in Clayton, Round Island in Clayton, Lake of the Isles on Wellesley Island, and Scenic View Park in Alexandria Bay. Save The River’s unique program provides a glimpse of the water quality at popular swimming areas during the peak recreational swimming season.

Location Pass/Fail Parts per 100mL
Frink Park    PASS < 1.0
Lake of the Isles    PASS < 1.0
Potter’s Beach    PASS 3.1
Round Island      n/a n/a
Scenic View Beach    PASS 1.0
Wilson’s Beach 3 ft    PASS < 1.0
Wilson’s Beach 6ft    PASS 1.0

 

Results are expressed in numbers of bacteria colonies found in 100 milliliter (mL) sample of swimming water.  The NY State Department of Health has set a swimming quality limit of 235 colonies of E. coli bacteria per 100 mL of water.

As in previous years, Save The River will be testing for E. coli bacteria in all of its swimming locations and will compare water quality results with state and federal regulations. Save The River will make the results available to the public each week with a pass/fail system at the organization’s office, online and by following Save The River on Facebook and Twitter. Results will also be posted on www.swimguide.org and in the T.I. Sun.

To sign up for weekly Beach Watch updates or for more information about the program please contact the Save The River office at (315)-686-2010 or visit www.savetheriver.org.

 

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Don’t Miss Out! Enter to Win a Sit-on-Top Angler Kayak

August 2nd, 2016 | Posted by Lee

2016 Summer Raffle Image (for inside plus)

Save The River is raffling an Ascend® FS12T sit-on-top angler kayak generously donated by Bass Pro Shops, Utica, New York.

Click Here to get to a printable entry form. Just fill out all the contact information and return it with your payment to:

Save The River
409 Riverside Drive
Clayton, NY 13624

We will fill out the tickets so you too can be entered to win. Drawing to be held September 6th, 2016.

Proceeds will benefit our work to enact a modern water levels plan – Plan 2014 – and remove the St. Lawrence River from the list of America’s most endangered rivers. For more information & to take personal action visit: plan2014now.savetheriver.org

Good Luck and Thank You for Supporting Save The River!

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2016 Beach Watch: Week 4 Results

July 28th, 2016 | Posted by Kate

Save The River Reports on Week 4 of Beach Watch Program

Save The River’s Beach Watch Program is in the process of monitoring popular summer swimming locations on the River from July 5th through August 29th on a weekly basis.  Save The River reports all samples collected on July 25, 2016 passed.

For the 2016 sampling season Save The River volunteers are collecting water quality samples at six swimming areas along the River: Wilson’s Beach in Cape Vincent, Potter’s Beach on Grindstone Island, Frink Dock in Clayton, Round Island in Clayton, Lake of the Isles on Wellesley Island, and Scenic View Park in Alexandria Bay. Save The River’s unique program provides a glimpse of the water quality at popular swimming areas during the peak recreational swimming season.

Location Pass/Fail Parts per 100mL
Frink Park PASS <1.0
Lake of the Isles PASS <1.0
Potter’s Beach PASS 14.6
Round Island NO SAMPLE NO SAMPLE
Scenic View Beach PASS 7.4
Wilson’s Beach 3 ft PASS 1.0
Wilson’s Beach 6ft PASS 1.0

 

Results are expressed in numbers of bacteria colonies found in 100 milliliter (mL) sample of swimming water.  The NY State Department of Health has set a swimming quality limit of 235 colonies of E. coli bacteria per 100 mL of water.

As in previous years, Save The River will be testing for E. coli bacteria in all of its swimming locations and will compare water quality results with state and federal regulations. Save The River will make the results available to the public each week with a pass/fail system at the organization’s office, online and by following Save The River on Facebook and Twitter. Results will also be posted on www.swimguide.org and in the T.I. Sun.

To sign up for weekly Beach Watch updates or for more information about the program please contact the Save The River office at (315)-686-2010 or visit www.savetheriver.org.

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2016 Beach Watch: Week 3 Results

July 21st, 2016 | Posted by Kate

Save The River Reports on Week 3 of Beach Watch Program

Save The River’s Beach Watch Program is in the process of monitoring popular summer swimming locations on the River from July 5th through August 29th on a weekly basis.  Save The River reports all the samples collected passed on July 18, 2016.

For the 2016 sampling season Save The River volunteers are collecting water quality samples at six swimming areas along the River: Wilson’s Beach in Cape Vincent, Potter’s Beach on Grindstone Island, Frink Dock in Clayton, Round Island in Clayton, Lake of the Isles on Wellesley Island, and Scenic View Park in Alexandria Bay. Save The River’s unique program provides a glimpse of the water quality at popular swimming areas during the peak recreational swimming season.

Location Pass/Fail Parts per 100mL
Frink Park PASS <1.0
Lake of the Isles PASS 1.0
Potter’s Beach PASS 98.7
Round Island PASS 2.0
Scenic View Beach PASS 7.3
Wilson’s Beach 3 ft PASS 16.0
Wilson’s Beach 6ft PASS 16.1

Results are expressed in numbers of bacteria colonies found in 100 milliliter (mL) sample of swimming water.  The NY State Department of Health has set a swimming quality limit of 235 colonies of E. coli bacteria per 100 mL of water.

As in previous years, Save The River will be testing for E. coli bacteria in all of its swimming locations and will compare water quality results with state and federal regulations. Save The River will make the results available to the public each week with a pass/fail system at the organization’s office, online and by following Save The River on Facebook and Twitter. Results will also be posted on www.swimguide.org and in the T.I. Sun.

To sign up for weekly Beach Watch updates or for more information about the program please contact the Save The River office at (315)-686-2010 or visit www.savetheriver.org.

 Save The River’s volunteers, Jean Daly and Ben Giardina, collect a water sample from Lake of the Isles near Wellesley Island. Photo Credit: Ron Daly

Save The River’s volunteers, Jean Daly and Ben Giardina, collect a water sample from Lake of the Isles near Wellesley Island. Photo Credit: Ron Daly

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Water Quality to be Tested at Popular Swimming Areas

June 27th, 2016 | Posted by Kate

Save The River’s annual summer Beach Watch Program will begin July 5th and will run through August 29th.  The program will provide weekly snapshots of water quality at popular swimming areas during the peak recreational swimming season.  Sites to be tested include Wilson’s Beach in Cape Vincent, Potter’s Beach on Grindstone Island, Frink Dock in Clayton, Round Island in Clayton, Lake of the Isles on Wellesley Island, and Scenic View Park in Alexandria Bay.


The samples collected each week are tested for Escherichia coli, (E. coli). E. coli is a fast spreading bacteria and can respond to environmental signals quickly in order to thrive in the water. Once tested, the bacteria levels in each sample are then compared to state and federal beach water quality standards, which are set at 235 colonies per 100 ml of water for the 2016 season. High levels of E. coli bacteria can cause health problems (including gastrointestinal illness), and can be dangerous to the very old, the very young, as well as those with a compromised immune system.


In 2015, all sites tested passed the weekly safety standard for E. coli levels, however, in previous years there have been occasional incidences of high bacteria levels, especially late in the summer season when water temperatures are at their highest. As a result, Save The River has continued to closely monitor water quality according to New York State Department of Health guidelines.


Beach Watch results are posted at the Save The River office and on the Save The River website, www.savetheriver.org every Thursday.  The results can also be found on the Save The River Facebook page, in The Thousands Islands Sun, online at theswimguide.org or on the SwimGuide app available on the App Store and Google Play.

Save The River summer intern Heidi Pearson conducts a pre-season assessment at Wilson's Beach.

Save The River summer intern Heidi Pearson conducts a pre-season assessment at Wilson's Beach.

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Thousand Islands ranked No. 1 on list of nation’s archipelagos

January 27th, 2016 | Posted by Lee

From today’s Watertown Daily Times editorial page, “Promoting the Thousand Islands as a wonderful tourist destination recently became a little easier. . . By focusing on water quality and watershed issues, members of Save the River do their part to attract visitors.” It is worth a full read.

With a super shout out to Save The River, the editorial correctly mentions our members. They are full-time and seasonal residents, boaters, kayakers, swimmers, anglers, divers, birders, hunters, scientists, artists, teachers, students of all ages, public figures, business owners, Canadian and American. And they are members because they believe in our mission to protect and preserve the St. Lawrence River.

Even so, we are not in this alone, and the River region (and Save The River) is blessed to have a tremendous number of groups and agencies all working to keep the land and water clean and sustaining for generations. A partial list of those we partner with: Waterkeeper AllianceThousand Islands Land TrustIndian River Lakes ConservancyMinna Anthony Common Nature Center – FriendsNew York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic PreservationIJC – International Joint CommissionAudubon New YorkDucks UnlimitedLake Ontario WaterkeeperWWF-CanadaSUNY-ESFAlgonquin to Adirondacks CollaborativeClarkson UniversityHealing Our Waters – Great Lakes CoalitionAntique Boat MuseumThe Nature Conservancy in New YorkWilson Hill Wildlife Management AreaSt. Lawrence River Institute of Environmental SciencesAlliance for the Great LakesThousand Islands Tourism CouncilAquatarium, and so many others.

We all have a place on the River and we all have a role in using it sustainably, and ensuring it is swimmable, drinkable and fishable to seven generations.

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Soon to be no more!

December 30th, 2015 | Posted by Lee
Soon to be no more! “One tube of exfoliating facewash can contain more than 350,000 microbeads and it’s estimated that 2.9 trillion microbeads enter U.S. waterways annually.”
Yesterday the President signed the microbeads ban. Thank you Senator Kirsten Gillibrand​ and Rep. Elise Stefanik​ for sponsoring this important piece of legislation.
There is still more to do. Plastic pollution from a raft of other sources continues. “Microbeads are a small part of the much larger problem of marine debris. As more people consume more products that are made of substances that do not biodegrade easily, if at all, the volume of plastics that end up in our waterways continues to grow,” says Steve Cohen writing in the Huffington Post.
For the bigger picture, read Microbeads, Marine Debris, Regulation and the Precautionary Principle, http://ow.ly/WshYz

Soon to be no more! “One tube of exfoliating facewash can contain more than 350,000 microbeads and it’s estimated that 2.9 trillion microbeads enter U.S. waterways annually.”

Yesterday the President signed the microbeads ban. Thank you Senator Kirsten Gillibrand​ and Rep. Elise Stefanik​ for sponsoring this important piece of legislation.5 Gyres Microbeads Twitter

There is still more to do. Plastic pollution from a raft of other sources continues. “Microbeads are a small part of the much larger problem of marine debris. As more people consume more products that are made of substances that do not biodegrade easily, if at all, the volume of plastics that end up in our waterways continues to grow,” says Steve Cohen writing in the Huffington Post.

For the bigger picture, read Microbeads, Marine Debris, Regulation and the Precautionary Principle.

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Last Chance to Have Your Year End Gift Matched!

December 27th, 2015 | Posted by Lee

Year End Appeal (last chance)

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Let’s treat the River as our small communities do, not as Montreal does.

December 11th, 2015 | Posted by Lee
We should celebrate the example they set for appropriate respect and “treatment” of our freshwater.
from the Thousand Islands Sun, Wed., December 9th, by Pamela McDowell, “Clayton takes final step to prevent pollution”
We were there watch and applaud the closure of the Village’s last remaining combined sanitary and stormwater overflow outfall. And it bears repeating, “This is great. With the backdrop of the city of Montreal purposely dumping eight billion liters of raw sewage into the river recently, this small community wth limited resources is doing the right thing. Montreal may do the above ground “pretty work” well, but this dirty work that we do underground is what counts.”
Also commending Clayton, James Wright, Director of the Development Authority of the North Country, in a letter published in the Watertown Daily Times, December 10th, “Clayton has enhanced quality of the river”, worth a read here: http://ow.ly/VMb7R

We should celebrate the example they set for appropriate respect and “treatment” of our freshwater.

Clayton CSO

from the Thousand Islands Sun, Wed., December 9th, by Pamela McDowell

We were there watch and applaud the closure of the Village’s last remaining combined sanitary and stormwater overflow outfall. And it bears repeating, “This is great. With the backdrop of the city of Montreal purposely dumping eight billion liters of raw sewage into the river recently, this small community wth limited resources is doing the right thing. Montreal may do the above ground “pretty work” well, but this dirty work that we do underground is what counts.”

Also commending Clayton, James Wright, Director of the Development Authority of the North Country, in a letter published in the Watertown Daily Times, December 10th, “Clayton has enhanced quality of the river“.

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St. Lawrence sewage dump: City releases test results

November 19th, 2015 | Posted by admin

From the CBC News Montreal:

St. Lawrence sewage dump: City releases test results
Fecal bacteria far above average concentrations, resemble numbers seen during heavy rains

The big spike on Nov. 12 was registered by a station close to one of the pipes that spewed the raw sewage, near LaSalle Boulevard and Stephens Street in Verdun. . . The reading that day was 2.7 million coliform units per 100 mL of river water.

While well upstream from Montreal, it is still useful to note that in New York State a fecal coliform level of 1000 units per 100 mL in the St. Lawrence River (or any freshwater body) can lead to the closure of beaches to swimming.

Making the comparison of the deliberate dumping of sewage to a rainy day is very concerning.

Looking Beyond Montreal:

Despite the obvious problems with Montreal’s actions, there is another important story to tell. Montreal’s planned, undiluted dump is an egregious case of sewage pollution – but this is by no means a problem limited to Montreal.

According to the Alliance for the Great Lakes, more than 24 billion gallons of combined untreated sewage and stormwater is dumped into the Great Lakes each year, and the Environmental Protection Agency reports 772 cities across the U.S. have combined sewage and stormwater systems, which release untreated sewage into surface water in wet conditions.

What you can do:

Make sure your elected leaders know that you prioritize modernizing wastewater infrastructure…

Educate yourself…

Become an advocate for freshwater, become a member of Save The River. Your volunteer effort and membership contribution enables Save The River to continue to protect and fight for clean water in the St Lawrence.

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