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Save The River Honors its Volunteers

August 11th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

2017 Volunteers & two of the Volunteers of the Year – Ron Daly (left) & Bill Taddeo (right)

On a beautiful summer day at the Bridge Authority’s Rift Camp, many of Save The River’s over 250 volunteers came together to share stories, celebrate their good work to protect the River, and to honor this year’s Volunteers of the Year – the men, women and students who have sampled the water quality at area swimming holes since 1998 – our Beach Watch Volunteers.

Save The River has many well-subscribed and robust volunteer programs – Common Tern Restoration, Riverkeeper & Jr. Riverkeeper, Shoal marking, Catch & Release, event support like Run for the River™ and others, and our many educational programs – and the volunteers for each are superstars. As we have said before, ‘Volunteers are the heart, soul and muscle of all we do to protect the St. Lawrence River.” But this year – a year with a few challenges where the water meets the shore – we chose to honor our Beach Watch volunteers.

  • This year we honor our volunteers for their long time involvement with the Beach Watch Program:
    • Jean and Ron Daly, monitoring Lake of the Isles since 2008
    • Ben Giardina, monitoring Lake of the Isles since 2015
    • Mary Mitchell, monitoring Scenic View Park since 2013
    • Maria Purcell, monitoring Potter’s Beach since 2008
    • Bill Taddeo, monitoring Wilsons Bay since 2014
    • Dick Withington, monitoring Round Island since 2007

What was true in 1998, when we introduced the program in a letter to local municipalities, is true today, when the results of our monitoring efforts are reported internationally, “Everyone loves to visit the ‘local swimming hole’ on a summer day on the River. Public dock areas, riverfront parks, and island beaches make for great swimming and sunning, digging in the sand or turning over rocks to find other River inhabitants sharing the same spot.” What we didn’t say explicitly then, but what we are all very aware of is that we all want the water we play in to be fishable, drinkable and swimmable. So we test once a week, rain or shine, for 9 weeks in the summer.

Over the years Save The River has worked in partnership with several associations including: Round Island Association, Lake of the Isles Association, the Thousand Islands Land Trust and property owners on and near Wilson’s Bay. Results are published weekly on our webpage, social media and in the Swim Guide website and app.

 

About Save The River® / Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper®

Since 1978 Save The River, a community-based membership not-for-profit organization, has been the leading environmental organization fighting for the ecological integrity of the St. Lawrence River. Its mission is to preserve, protect and restore the River now, and for generations to come. It delivers educational programs to students and adults about the River, its fragility, and the importance of protecting it. Save The River is committed to being a forceful advocate for policies and programs that promote clean water protections and to resist those that eliminate or weaken them.

Please consider volunteering and becoming a member of Save The River to support our education programs and advocacy for a healthy St. Lawrence River.

Contact us at: info@savetheriver.org, or (315) 686-2010

Join or donate at: www.donate.savetheriver.org

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Ontario Senator Bob Runciman, a true “Friend of the River”, leaves the Senate

August 9th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

We note the departure of Senator Bob Runciman from the Canadian Senate and applaud his outstanding service to the St. Lawrence River. He was an early supporter and has been a long term member of Save The River, founding the Canadian chapter. He has been a consistent champion of cross-border initiatives important to the health and sustainable use of the River.

Senator Runciman receives the Friend of the River award February 4, 2017

Earlier this year Save The River was pleased to award Senator Runciman its “Friend of the River” award for his work on major issues facing the River and the communities that depend on it being healthy. He was a vocal and influential proponent of the new water levels plan – Plan 2014 – to restore vital wetland habitat and key species to the River. He has been engaged with local, provincial, state and federal officials on both sides of the River on the issue of prevention and control of invasive species and the lessening of challenges to boaters and anglers in our multinational waters.

We take Senator Runciman at his word that he is not retiring and hope to see him frequently on the River where he has had such a positive impact over the years.

 

Save The River’s Friend of the River™ award is given to individuals or groups who have contributed in an exceptional way to protecting the St. Lawrence River either through advocacy or programs in line with Save The River’s mission and vision.

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It’s a big River we all share, . . .

July 15th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

. . . and we at Save The River love our part of it.

Join us however you can in our work to preserve, protect and restore the St. Lawrence River, . . . now and for generations to come.

click the image for a larger version

https://donate.savetheriver.org/
#itsourriver #stlawrenceriver

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No Longer “Business as Usual”, Climate Change Changes Thinking

June 1st, 2017 | Posted by Lee

Not our usual allies in the effort to restore, preserve and protect the St. Lawrence River – major U.S. corporations.

But in a year of historic water levels brought on by record breaking rainfall, following years of wild swings in weather, increased intensity of storm events, many overwhelming infrastructure and disrupting the environment and human activity:

WE KNOW WE MUST ADDRESS CLIMATE CHANGE.

The St. Lawrence River Valley is not immune. The impacts are not occurring somewhere else. And, while our activities may not add much to the global picture, the River we rely on for physical, mental and spiritual sustenance will be impacted.

The Paris Agreement, agreed to by 195 countries, is a, if not the, most important step taken to date to address climate change. As the world’s leading economy, the world’s leading innovator, and the world’s leading consumer of energy and emitter of its by-products the United States must stay engaged in the world-wide effort to address climate change.

We must stay in the Paris Agreement.

If the environmental perspective isn’t persuasive, look at the list of of major corporations supporting the Paris Agreement. Visit the website, “Businesses urge president to remain in Paris Agreement

Join some of America’s largest corporations and call the White House and your Senators and Representative today and tell them we must stay in the Paris Agreement:

White House: (202) 456-1414
U.S. Capitol Switchboard: (202) 224-3121

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Dismissal of Scientists from EPA Panel Concerning

May 19th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

Absolutely spot on. “It’s critical that the EPA continues to use the highest quality research when making policy decisions, and the recent dismissal of these Members of the Board of Scientific Counselors is very concerning,” said Congresswoman Stefanik, in a letter to the EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt she signed with 71 other members of Congress concerning the recent dismissal of several members of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Board of Scientific Counselors.

Thanks to Rep. Elise Stefanik​ for speaking out.

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High Water Level Cause? Answer from South Shore

April 29th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

A week ago we posted, “Nature plays the biggest role in water levels in the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River system,” disputing the unfounded, but frequently made claim that the new water management plan – Plan 2014 – is to blame. Yesterday in a lengthy, well-sourced and comprehensive article the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle agreed.

The entire article, “High water on Lake Ontario: Who’s to blame?” by Steve Orr and Meaghan M. McDermott, is a must read. It puts to bed two questions that have been burning up the press, the airwaves and the inboxes of elected officials (and Save The River) for weeks.

to quote the article:

Who or what is really to blame for the high water?

This spring’s high water is an act of God. It is the consequence of heavy rainfall in March and especially in early April, when the amount of water entering Lake Ontario set a record. Similar high water has afflicted the St. Lawrence River, which carries the flow from Lake Ontario to the Atlantic Ocean.”

“So Plan 2014 is to blame then?

All the experts have disavowed any connection between high water and the regulations.”

and, from a longtime and vocal critic of Plan 2014 (as the article points out) Frank Sciremammano, “Under either the old plan or the new plan, we would be where we are now.”

As Sciremammano says, “it depends on the weather“. Therefore it is incumbent on us to leave Plan 2014 in place, balancing the many shared interests and uses of the Lake and the River, and use our resources, our ingenuity and our collective political will to realistically deal with the situation and to make certain that what we build in the future takes into account the dominant role of Nature and the reality of these dynamic water bodies and shorelines.

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It Bears Repeating – Denying Real Cause Will Not Lower Water Levels

April 27th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

We’ve posted on this before, Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River are [now] running about 21” higher than average. And the anger and frustration of shoreline property owners is understandable.

What isn’t understandable is the insistence of certain public figures to blame Plan 2014 – the just implemented water management plan for the Lake and River – as the cause.

Today’s coverage of the story from news outlets on the South shore of Lake Ontario to the River region points out what we have been saying all along, Nature plays the biggest role in water levels in the Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River system. The River is fed by the outflow from Lakes Ontario and Erie, snowfall, and rainfall and runoff. And at times its outflow must be controlled due to conditions on the lower river below the Moses-Saunders Dam.

> from the The Daily News

The root of the current issues is that heavy rainfall and inflows from feeder systems such as the peaking Ottawa River were widespread on both divides of the dam.

also, “according to Arun Heer, an official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the secretary of the International Lake Ontario St. Lawrence River Board, . . . there’s not room to outflow the water from the lake [due to the high water level below the dam.]

> from North Country Public Radio

Heavy rains on saturated soils amidst snow melt have inundated the lake, the river, and their tributaries this spring. The Ottawa River, which empties into the St. Lawrence, is flowing at record-high levels. Meanwhile, downstream near Montreal, the St. Lawrence has already flooded, triggering evacuations and boil water alerts in some communities.

meaning, as Frank Bevaqua, spokesman for the IJC, explained to NCPR, “There’s no plug that can be pulled just to drain the system. There’s an awful lot of water in the system and only so much that can be done.

As for the solution proposed by some public figures – “withdraw from Plan 2014”. That is no solution at all.

> from the Watertown Daily Times editorial page

But arguing against a plan that will restore the health of these waterways is foolish. We cannot march backward to continue practices that have damaged the ecosystem. This will help no one. . . . Plan 2014 is the most sensible approach to ensuring that Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River return to a healthier condition.

Our opinion?

The solution to this year’s, or some decades hence high water level is not a return to an outdated plan under which the same conditions have repeatedly occurred and which has led to precipitous declines in wetland habitat and species. It is instead incumbent on us to use our resources, our ingenuity and our collective political will to assist those impacted now to realistically deal with the situation and to make certain what we build in the future takes the dominant role of Nature and the reality of these dynamic water bodies and shorelines into account.

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Changing Currents; This Saturday, April 29th – Be There!

April 25th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

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Join Us! Click here for more details

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Environmental Documentary Featuring St. Lawrence River to Premiere in Clayton

April 17th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

 

Saturday, April 29th at 4:00pm Save The River is bringing the award-winning documentary “Changing Currents: Protecting North America’s Rivers” to the Clayton Opera House for its East Coast premiere.

The film explores the many challenges facing the St. Lawrence River and other North American waterways and highlights several significant restoration and protection efforts underway in the U.S. and Canada. It was produced by MediaLab, an award-winning, applied research and media production program based at Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) in Tacoma, Washington.

During nearly one year of research and interviews, in addition to the St. Lawrence River region, the MediaLab team traveled to cities across North America. They spoke with citizens, community leaders, elected officials, and a variety of organizations working to protect rivers in their areas. While on the St. Lawrence, they spoke to members of the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, researchers at the St. Lawrence River Institute of Environmental Sciences, and members of Save The River.

Following the screening the filmmakers, as well as St. Lawrence region experts from New York and Ontario, will hold a discussion with the audience.

The screening, sponsored by Save The River / Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper, is open to the public with a suggested donation of $10.00 to support Save The River’s education programs and advocacy efforts to protect the St. Lawrence River.

Watch the trailer for the “Changing Currents” East Coast Premiere

 

from Jeff Garnsey, Save The River Board President, River guide and a participant in the film

“As a third-generation guide, I have seen firsthand the damage to the River from poor stewardship practices and thoughtless actions,” said Jeff Garnsey, River Guide and Save The River Board President. “But I have seen the positive results of informed, persistent community action. This film is a great examination of both the challenges and the successes in our efforts to restore rivers like the St. Lawrence.”

from a member of the documentary team

“River restoration has come a long way in the last 50 years,” said MediaLab member John Struzenberg, who served as the film’s chief videographer and editor. “What people don’t realize is that there is still a lot of work to be done.”

Click here for more information about the film.

About MediaLab at PLU

MediaLab is an award–winning, applied research and media production organization housed within the Center for Media Studies at Pacific Lutheran University’s School of Arts and Communication. MediaLab students work on projects across the media spectrum, including market research, photography, graphic design, web design, writing, video, public relations, event planning, filmmaking, and more.

The Changing Currents research team members are: Creative Director Rachel Lovrovich; John Struzenberg chief videographer and editor; Christopher Boettcher, social media associate; Kelly Lavelle, publicity, design, and photography; and Joshua Wiersma, assistant editor and videographer. The team was led by Robert Marshall Wells, Ph.D., an associate professor of communication at PLU and the film’s executive producer.

About Save The River / Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper

Since 1978 Save The River, a community-based membership not-for-profit organization, has been the leading environmental organization fighting for the ecological integrity of the St. Lawrence River. Its mission is to preserve, protect and restore the River now, and for generations to come. It delivers educational programs to students and adults about the River, its fragility, and the importance of protecting it. Save The River is committed to being a forceful advocate for policies and programs that promote clean water protections and to resist those that eliminate or weaken them.

Please consider becoming a member of Save The River to support our education programs and advocacy for a healthy St. Lawrence Riverwww.donate.savetheriver.org 

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Seriously?! NO Great Lakes Restoration funding, ZERO!

March 16th, 2017 | Posted by Lee

Seriously?! NO Great Lakes Restoration funding, ZERO!

Page 42 of President’s budget plan released today “Eliminates funding for…Great Lakes Restoration Initiative”. This program has received bipartisan support in every budget since its inception in 2010. Over $130,000,000 has come to New York State to improve wetlands, fish habitat, invasive species detection and prevention, pollution abatement and other important projects that have created direct and indirect jobs, improving our environment and our economy. Over $6.4 million has been spent directly in the St. Lawrence River watershed.

Zero it out? Seriously. Decidedly. Outrageous!

It is just one part of the budget’s assault on programs that protect the water we depend on for our world-class fisheries, to sustain our recreation and tourism based economy, AND to drink!

Among many other programs cut or zeroed out is a Department of Agriculture program that assists communities with fewer than 10,000 people with water and sewer infrastructure.

It’s hard to imagine describing the St. Lawrence River as “great” if the water is no longer swimmable, fishable, or drinkable.

The President’s budget plan is chock full of disappointments for anyone who has benefitted from the last half century of progress the United States has made in air and water quality and human health.

Common sense tells us we have more to do to make sure every American has access to clean air and water, both basic human rights.

Instead for Save The River / Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper and our members and supporters, this budget is nothing less than a full on assault on the health of one of North America’s most important waterways and the people and communities that depend on it being and staying healthy.

Call the Congressional switchboard, (202) 224-3121, to connect with your Senators & Representative with the simple message “I support clean water programs – GLRI, revolving loan funds, & EPA”. Then call White House with same message (202) 456-1414 or (202) 456-1111.

Please also consider becoming a member of Save The River to strengthen our ability to fight for a healthy St. Lawrence River, now and for generations to come. Add your voice to thousands of others working to preserve, protect and restore one of the great rivers in North America.

#WePersist

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